Ontario Helped Fund The Opioid Crisis

Find Out How Ontario Helped Create the Opioid Crisis, Costing Lives while Using Taxpayer’s Money To Do It!

What Is The Culpability Of Our Nation?

oxycontinWe have become a nation of pill poppers. Pain tablets are the prime culprits — more specifically, opioids. A broad category of drugs derived from natural or synthetic forms of opium or morphine. Many of the medications in the group, which includes everything from Percocet to OxyContin to Fentanyl. Their chemical composition is such that the Canadain’s just a few carbon molecules from being a nation of heroin addicts.

Two decades ago opioid sales were a small fraction of today’s figures, as such drugs were reserved for the worst cancer pain. Why? Because drugs whose chemical composition resemble heroin’s are nearly as addictive as heroin itself, and doctors generally wouldn’t use such powerful medications on anybody but terminal cancer patients. But that changed years ago, and ever since, addiction to painkillers has become a staple of news headlines. More often, there are the celebrities, such as Rush Limbaugh, who admitted on his radio show years ago that he was addicted to painkillers, or actor Heath Ledger, who was found dead with oxycodone in his system, or rapper Eminem, who entered rehab to address his reliance on Vicodin and other pills.

PurdueNo one is more successful — or controversial — than Purdue Pharma, maker of the No. 1 drug in the class: OxyContin, which generated $3.1 billion in revenue in 2010. Purdue and its marketing prowess are the biggest reasons such drugs are now widely prescribed for all sorts of pain, “Purdue played a very large role in making physicians feel comfortable about opioids.” And as we’ll see, Purdue’s past and present go a long way toward explaining how so many Canadians came to be in the grip of potent painkillers.

When it was introduced into the U.S. and Canada in the late ’90s, OxyContin was touted as nearly addiction-proof — only to leave a trail of dependence and destruction. Its marketing was misleading enough that Purdue pleaded guilty in 2007 to a federal criminal count of mis-branding the drug “with intent to defraud and mislead the public,” paid $635 million in penalties to the U.S. alone, and today remains on the corporate equivalent of probation.

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NOT FIT FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION

100 Times Stronger Than Fentanyl

FENTANYL AND BEYOND

Fentanyl use and distribution has exploded in Canada over the last couple of years, and it’s going to get worse before it gets better, and fentanyl seems to be just the tip of the iceberg.

Fentanyl’s analogues, or variations, have increased in number and potency over the last year, along with Carfentanil, and non-fentanyl opioids like W-18, and U-47700 that have emerged as of late.

Increasing access to naloxone, safe injection sites, and increased opioid reporting and early-warning systems will help, but won’t stop the market for the drug from increasing.

The practice of drug producers and traffickers cutting their product with supplemental substances is not new. But the use of fentanyl and other opioids to do so is not only uncommonly deadly, it can also clearly trace its roots to the “the national crisis of prescription painkiller abuse, and associated medical prescribing practices.”

 

“Anchored between domestic criminal entities and those based in China, the Internet – via the surface web and the dark web – continues to serve as the main gateway for a thriving, open illicit opioid marketplace in Canada.”

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TOXIC “POISONING” OR “OVERDOSE?”

The Language Of Addiction

The intent of our words makes all the difference of understanding our own stigma’s.

The stigma of addiction and the lack of organized advocacy for affected people have been the biggest barriers to creating change for so very many here in Canada and around the world.

But what about the language used by those professionals supposedly in the know? The accidental “overdose” of fentanyl  laced drugs requires us revisit the language surrounding this exploding epidemic and health crisis.

Aren’t we using the wrong language here to describe the toxic lacing of illicit drugs, to a level of potency that makes the use of them so dangerous, so poisonous, that unbeknownst to them, what was a typical dose for an addict, now becomes deadly?

“When a patient has over-consumed alcohol, we call it alcohol poisoning, we don’t write about it as an alcohol overdose,” – Dr. Edward Xie

While people tend to imagine that overdoses primarily occur when drug users are alone, in fact, at least half of them happen in the presence of others. In England, for example, 80% of users who overdosed did so while with others and 54% had also witnessed others who had OD’d. A study in New York similarly found that 57% of over 1,000 crack and heroin users had personally witnessed at least one overdose. A Rhode Island study revealed that 35% of opioid users had overdosed at least once themselves and two-thirds had seen someone else do so.

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Psychonaut’s Story Seems Doomed

McKenna’s Story – Untold On The Big Screen As Of Yet

Jim Carrey has not signed on to star in a biopic about late ethnobotanist, philosopher and psychedelic drugs advocate Terence McKenna, despite a bogus report containing fake quotes wrongly attributed to the actor. Gossip Cop can exclusively correct this story.

 

Gossip Cop went on to say that, McKenna was an unusual figure in the world of philosophy who spoke and wrote about a variety of subjects, most notably the positive effects of experimenting with psychedelic mushrooms. A 2016 documentary about Terrance McKenna, titled True Hallucinations, chronicled his travels into the amazon while under the influence of psychedelic substances, the chaos at La Chorrera, the imagination, time, the Logos, belief, hope, madness, and doubt. Created by Peter Bergmann, this project is an expansion of ideas first presented in “The Transcendental Object At The End Of Time”.

The website, McKennite.com, recently published an article claiming, Carrey, has signed on to star in a film about the philosopher’s life, and even alleges the actor took psychedelics to get into character. The outlet erroneously quotes Carrey as saying, “I’ve seen things which no human being has ever seen before, and no other human being will ever see again. I retreated to nature and took five grams of dried mushrooms in order to prepare for this role.” Carrey never said any of this, but the site went on to add more made-up quotations from the actor supposedly touting the benefits of hallucinogens.

“If anyone could have portrayed the life of a man (Terrance McKenna) that has had such a dramatic, positive spin on psychedelics, it would have been Carrey to do it, and do it well.” – Jeff Dibble

This bogus report was later picked up and spread by the websites Brain Stain and True Activist, which further claimed the actor is “undergoing a massive transformation” for the role by “allowing himself to ‘trip’ on psychedelic plants.” However, none of this is remotely true. It’s possible this story was concocted simply because Carrey bears a considerable resemblance to McKenna, after recently growing a beard, but he isn’t playing the philosopher on screen.

A rep for the actor exclusively tells Gossip Cop, “Jim Carrey has not signed on to do a movie about Terence McKenna and any quotes attributed to him about experimenting with psychedelics are absolutely false.”

McKennite.com is now “pinging”  Steve Buscemi for the role stating: “After Jim Carrey distanced himself from the role, it is up to Steve Buscemi to revive the spirit of the late psychedelic explorer on the big screen in an upcoming biopic.” However no reports have been substantiated at this time.

If we as a community believe in anything, we believe in feeling good in the moment. The felt presence of immediate experience. This is what has been stolen from you, by capitalism, by religion, by linear thinking, by strategizing. We’re always about to be happy, or we’re always about to be free. And while we’re about to be free and about to be happy, life passes us by. This is because western ideologies are ideologies of delayed gratification. It comes after death, after retirement, after coitus, it’s always after something that it comes. Well, I’ve got news for you, this kind of thing is chasing your own tail. The felt presence of immediate experience is the only world you will ever know. Everything beyond that is conjecture and supposition. – Terrance McKenna

Terrance McKenna2
Terrance McKenna Nov. 16, 1946 – April 3, 2000 RIP

Rest in Peace. “I wish that If only  I could have met you, talked, learned more, and laughed.”– Jeff Dibble

 

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – A Daily Living Experience

My Personal Journey with PTSD

A Very Personal Journey

Ptsd MazeThis is not something that I like to talk about. It’s very hard for me to find the words that I’m trying to write, and it’s very hard for me to not end up in a heaping mass, drenched with tears on my bedroom floor. I have been suffering in silence with PTSD for about 50 years now. I always knew that I felt “different,” I felt “separate from,” and that I felt that something was definitely wrong. That feeling of an “impending doom” has carried on with me for all of these years, it still carries on today, mater of fact, almost everyday. It’s been a good day when I can stay distracted enough to engage with life’s daily monotony, let alone certain challenges that we all face from time to time. I feel overwhelmed most of the time. I spend a good percentage of the day mentally talking myself through the most mundane tasks, trying not to get overwhelmed, staying emotionally regulated, checking and re-checking my emotions and behaviours “It’s exhausting.”

What is PTSD Anyway?

The Canadian Mental Health Association say’s;

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental illness. It often involves exposure to trauma from single events that involve death or the threat of death or serious injury. PTSD may also be linked to ongoing emotional trauma, such as abuse in a relationship.

Something is traumaticWhat is PTSD when it is very frightening, overwhelming and causes a lot of distress. Trauma is often unexpected, and many people say that they felt powerless to stop or change the event. Traumatic events may include crimes, natural disasters, accidents, war or conflict, sexual violence or other threats to life or safety. It could be an event or situation that you experience yourself or something that happens to others, including loved ones.

PTSD causes intrusive symptoms such as re-experiencing the traumatic event. Many people have vivid nightmares, flashbacks, or thoughts of the event that seem to come from nowhere. They often avoid things that remind them of the event—for example, someone who was hurt in a car crash might avoid driving.

PTSD can make people feel very nervous or “on edge” all the time. Many feel startled very easily, have a hard time concentrating, feel irritable, or have problems sleeping well. They may often feel like something terrible is about to happen, even when they are safe. Some people feel very numb and detached. They may feel like things around them aren’t real, feel disconnected from their body or thoughts, or have a hard time feeling emotions.

People also experience a change in their thoughts and mood related to the traumatic event. For some people, alcohol or other drugs can be a way to cope with PTSD.

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